Roy Emanuel Lundquist 23 Sept 1902-27 Sep 1965

Lundquist, Roy Emanuel mission

Biography
By Elsie Gladys Lundquist McNabb, sister to Roy in Interview with Elsie McNabb Saye, July 27, 1989, by Gordon McNabb, his wife Sally and daughter Sara, page 9.

Roy, number five, was the very religious one that carried out my father’s dream, I guess, that his boys go on missions. He went to Germany after the war [World War I] and I think he got along on about $20 a month. Ruby sent him money, I know, and Ruby wrote to him and I have all of Roy’s letters while he was over there. He wrote them for posterity. Some of them tell how horrible it was after the war.

Lundquist, Roy Emanuel mission 1

Roy and I were close. He used to be good enough to take me to the dances at high school, to help me learn to dance, and take me to Church activities. He would take me to special things like a restaurant dinner type of thing. [Gordon comments at this point that Roy was the uncle he always felt close to. He was the one he met. “We were kindred spirits.”]

He became a district president and a patriarch [in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints]. We were close in our religion, in our ethics, or whatever you want to call it. He helped me with my grammar and composition because I only got about a year and a half of high school. I’m sorry to record that I got sick, then I had to quit high school I finally went to LDS Business College. But Roy would check up on my English. Any mistakes that I would make, he’d listen and correct me, so that when I went to California with the mother and father of the girl he was going with, Alice Curtis, they thought I was a graduate, that I was college material. I think a lot of that was due to the fact that he helped me so much. We idolized him. He was like the one I wanted to find – I would never be satisfied unless they were like Roy, to marry. He was different from Don [her husband Donald Oliver McNabb. Sara, you’ll never know who the one is till it hits you. It’s not the one you think. It’s not always the one your mind tells you or you mother or dad or anybody.

Anyway, he liked Don and we were great pals. When he got married and I got married, we were still great pals. We had a lot of good times together. Roy and Leila and Don and I. So I look forward to seeing all of these in the Spirit World. Leila asked me to be her maid of honor when she and Roy got married. I was about 6 months pregnant with Frances [Frances Mildred McNabb Gray at the time.

NOTE: Roy’s letters are found online at http://www.geocities.com/wallygray25/M3e.htm

 

The Theodore Turley Family Book, pp. 504-505
Roy Emanuel Lundquist

Roy was born in Salt Lake City, Utah to Richard and Grace Bushman Lundquist. He married Leila Cotterell in the Salt Lake Temple on June 19, 1929. They had three children, all born in Salt Lake City.

Roy served a mission to Germany in 1922. He graduated as a civil engineer from the U. of Utah. After graduation, because of the depression, he worked for the Salt Lake City Engineer Dept. for $90 a month. He soon landed a better job with the Utah State Road Commission. The first day was on the Great Salt Lake desert with 129 degree temperature in the shade. In 1935 he took a civil service offer with the U.S. Engineers at Sacramento. In 1939 he transferred back to Salt Lake, this time as hydrologic engineer with the U.S. Weather Bureau. The war upset this program in 1942 and he was offered the chance to fill a vacancy at Hartford, Connecticut as “weatherman.” He was one of the first weathermen broadcasting on the radio. In addition to work, he and his family were very involved and happy with the church in New England.

After the war Roy was called to Cincinnati, Ohio to take charge of the new river forecasting unit; of the weather bureau for the Ohio Valley. He remained in Cincinnati until he died on Sept. 27, 1965 of a heart attack. A comment he made in a letter concerning his life: “We haven’t accumulated any wealth during our rolling around the country but we have had some wonderful experiences and satisfactions. It has helped the children more than it has hindered them. It has helped them most to appreciate the gospel and the church and has given them confidence. Parents seem to derive most of their blessings in later life from the successes and development of their children along the lines that they wanted them to go.

He tried to serve the Lord with all his heart, mind and strength. In addition to his call as a missionary in the Swiss German Mission, he initiated the Scout Explorer program while in Salt Lake City. In Sacramento he was MIA superintendent, on the High Council; in Salt Lake City he was a member of the stake Sunday School Board; in Hartford he served as branch president and district president. In Cincinnati he was district president, a member of the district council, stake Sunday School superintendent, branch president, bishop, stake missionary, and a counselor in the stake mission presidency. In addition to this he had numerous teaching assignments and was a patriarch when he passed away.

Children of Roy and Leila Cotterell Lundquist:
Joanne Louise, born May 11, 1930. Joanne married Richard Hal Lesser in the Logan Temple on July 10, 1952 and they have five children.

Richard LeRoy, born Oct. 4, 1933. Richard married Alma Mason in 1957 and they had three daughters, but were later divorced. He is remarried and has a son. Richard served a mission to California. .

John Steven, born June 23, 1937 in Sacramento, California, John served a mission to Montana and married Karen Molen in the Alberta Temple in 1966. They live in Provo and have three sons.

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About annlaemmlenlewis

I am member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and I am currently serving as a Missionary in the Washington Yakima Mission. Welcome to my personal blog, Ann's Words, and my Mission blog, Our Yakima Mission. If you are interested in family history stories and histories, you can find those posted in Ann's Stories. Thanks for looking in!
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